Back

Default welcome msg!

Fast Free Shipping* On Your Entire Order!

Drywood Termites

Drywood Termites

Drywood Termites

Cryptotermes cavifrons

Color: worker: White to grayish. Soldier: Heads are brownish to yellowish-brown. Alates (adult): Vary in color from dark brown to light yellowish tan.

Size: Male and Female reproductive up to 1/2 inch long. During the winged stage there are 4 equal size wings that extend longer than the body by 1/8-1/4 inch. Soldier 3/8 inch.

Unlike the Subterranean termite, they do not require any contact with the soil. They live in un decayed wood with low moisture content. Infestations can occur in structural timbers in buildings, pieces of furniture, flooring, doors and doorframes, window trim, wooden picture frames, and other isolated pieces of wood.

Since drywood termites form colonies within sound dead wood, they have no access to free water. This is the reason for their common name, drywood termites. Instead, they must either acquire water through metabolism (of wood) or through moisture in their environments. Some drywood termites make colonies in hot, dry areas, where the high temperatures and low humidity reduce the available water from the environment. Since these termites live within their food, they must find ways to remove waste from their colonies. Drywood termites make small holes in the wood they infest and occasionally kick out fecal pellets or frass. Piles of the pellets usually accumulate under these openings. These dry, smooth, and often powdery looking pellets are very characteristic of the presence of drywood termites.

Drywood termites do not need a connection to soil and there is no soil in their feeding galleries. They do not build mud tunnels; they construct large, irregular galleries that run across and with the wood grain, with a very smooth, clean, and sandpaper-like appearance.

Wood and occasionally other cellulose materials. They eat wood in houses, utility poles, furniture and dying trees. They cannot digest the cellulose directly. They have other microorganisms (protozoans and bacteria) in their stomachs that help break down the cellulose which then can be digested by their own metabolism.

These termites consume both the harder summerwood and the soft springwood of timbers. Infestations can occur in structural timbers in buildings, pieces of furniture, flooring, doors and doorframes, window trim, wooden picture frames, and other isolated pieces of wood.

Prevention:

  • Quite often, termite problems encountered by homeowners could have been prevented through sound initial design practices, mechanical alterations or sanitation. The basic premise behind prevention is denying termites' access to wood. Preventing drywood termite infestation is more difficult than preventing subterranean species as the outside of homes have many sites where termites may enter. However, certain preventative measures can be effective.
  • Remove all potential sources of outdoor infestation such as stored lumber, firewood, scrap lumber and dead trees or woody shrubbery. Screen attic or foundation vents with bug screen to exclude drywood termite alates. The screening of vents along with good maintenance of window screens will exclude a multitude of unwanted critters from your home. This may not be practical in areas of high humidity, since it restricts air movement needed to keep attics and subfloor areas dry.
  • Drywood termites will not enter wood that has a sound coat of paint. Before painting, seal any cracks, natural checks, construction scars, crevices and joints with wood putty. No effective way has been developed to prevent drywood termites from entering under or through wood shingles.
  • Preconstruction planning offers opportunities for preventing termite infestation. Wooden structural members can be soaked in or painted with borax derived wood preservatives. These materials may not penetrate wood deeply, though, so a touch-up will be necessary before closing in the building. Commercially pressure-treated wood is more desirable and may be used as framing members, subflooring, window and doorframes, trim and possibly even wood siding. The extra cost of pressure-treated wood may be justified where termite problems are common.

Treatment:

  • Fumigation. If infestations are widespread or suspected in areas that cannot be inspected or replaced (such as in wood shingles, between walls or in eaves or attics), fumigation is a control alternative. First, a structure is completely enveloped in gas-proof tarpaulins or heavy plastic sheeting. Masonry construction with flat, composition shingle roofs may be sealed around the doors, windows and vents. Then a fumigant gas is released into the structure. The gas penetrates into cracks, crevices, void areas and directly into wood to kill termite colonies. Lethal concentrations are contained by the tarpaulins long enough to permit uniform penetration deep into all infested areas.

Despite its effectiveness, there are disadvantages to fumigation. It does not leave any chemical residue to deter future infestation. Fumigation is extremely hazardous and the occupants of the home may have to vacate for several days. Also, fumigation is labor intensive and requires the specialized knowledge of a licensed, professional pest control firm and can be expensive. Fumigation requires special certification because of the extreme hazard. It is imperative to remove all household pets, plants and food products from the home prior to treatment.

Choosing a Pest Control Company:

  • Get at least three quotes. The lowest price does not always mean the best deal. When shopping for a pest control professional, ask specifically for the amount of experience they have in dealing with subterranean termite control. Clarify the type of coverage (such as service after the sale) you can expect with a particular contract.
  • The pest control company should make a complete inspection of the entire building to determine the origin and the extent of the infestation. This inspection is extremely important because without a thorough inspection, proper treatment cannot be recommended. You should be given a written report stating the extent of the infestation and probable origin (ground or aerial) with a graph indicating areas of activity. The report also details what structures or areas will be treated and how, what product or insecticide and rate will be used, and any warranty or limitations to the treatment.
  • Ask if the contract makes any distinction between the Formosan subterranean termite and native subterranean termite. Any company whose contract makes a distinction probably realizes the need for this separation.
  • Ask for references on completed Formosan subterranean termite work. Do not be pressured by a company to treat your structure immediately (today). Taking a couple of weeks to thoroughly research treatment options and different pest control companies is not unreasonable. Ask if they object to a second opinion concerning the method of treatment or extent of damage.
  • Call the Better Business Bureau in your area to see if a company has any outstanding complaints against them. The key to any decision is confidence in the company you choose. Get value and service for your money.
 

 

 
 

MANUFACTURER RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS AND TREATMENT FOR Drywood Termites CONTROL

Pests need food, water, and shelter. Often the problem may be solved just by removing these key items. Before even thinking about chemical pest control, it is important to be aware of Pest’s Conducive conditions & It’s Recommendations.

Pesticides can be purchased in many different forms, each form has specific uses and application methods The pesticide application method you choose depends on the nature and habits of the target pest, the properties of the pesticide, the suitability of the application equipment, and the cost and efficiency of alternative methods. Your choice is often predetermined by one or more of these factors. Follow label directions for volume recommendations and application rates based on the pest to be controlled and utilize appropriate application tips on equipment. , these application methods are for informational purposes only. To know specific applications method/s for the product you buy, please refer actual packages for complete Label Verbiage.

1-12 of 18

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

1-12 of 18

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2

Grid List

Set Descending Direction