Back

Default welcome msg!

Fast Free Shipping* On Your Entire Order!

Bagworms

Bagworms

Bagworms

Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis

Color:   The bag is made of silk and bits of host leaves and twigs. These materials are interwoven to disguise and add strength to the case.

Size:

When the caterpillar is mature, the bag may be thirty to fifty mm in total length. Young larvae hatching from the eggs are approximately two mm long, glossy black on the back and dull amber on the undersurface of their bodies. Full grown larvae are dull, dirty gray and splotched with darker markings toward the head. Mature larvae are about eighteen to twenty-five mm long. The adult female bagworm is worm-like. It lacks eyes, wings, functional legs and mouth parts. She never leaves the bag that she constructed as a larva. The adult male is sooty black and moth-like with transparent wings that are nearly devoid of scales.

  • There are three types of bagworms found the North America:
    The Evergreen bagworm, the Snail case bagworm, and the grass bagworm. 
  • Evergreen bagworms are the most common and are found in the Eastern United States from New England south through Texas and west to Nebraska. 
  • The Snail case bagworm is currently found throughout the mid Atlantic and is making its way to the Pacific coast.  Each type of bagworm creates a specific type of bag relative to its feeding habits.  Often, people will confuse Bagworms with Tent Caterpillars.  

The bagworm is a perennial insect pest of arborvitae, juniper, pine, spruce, and many other evergreen species. It also attacks certain deciduous trees such as black locust, honey locust, and sycamore. This bagworm is most common in southern regions of Pennsylvania. Infestations seldom are noticed north of Interstate 80 in the state. The spread of the bagworm is slow since adult females are unable to fly. Their dispersal over wide areas occurs mainly through movement of infested nursery stock and ornamental plants, or by ballooning (wind dispersal) of small bagworm larvae during early June.

  • The larvae feed on needles and leaves and as young caterpillars; they feed on the upper parts of plants leaving holes in the foliage.
  • The Grass Bagworm is considered a relative to the Evergreen bagworm because it feeds on grasses and creates one-inch long silk bags that are found attached to grass. 
  • Bagworm larvae injure plants when they feed on needles and leaves. Young caterpillars feed on the upper epidermis of host plants, sometimes leaving small holes in the foliage. Damage by mature larvae is especially destructive to evergreen plants. Trees such as sycamore, willow, and other deciduous trees, usually refoliate after heavy defoliation. Unfortunately, bagworm infestations generally go undetected until damage is complete, and the large bags of these insects are very conspicuous. Early detection of an infestation requires careful examination of host plants for the presence of small bagworms attached to the leaves or needles.
  • The Grass Bagworm is considered a relative to the Evergreen bagworm because it feeds on grasses and creates one-inch long silk bags that are found attached to grass.  Their bags aren't considered a nuisance.
  • Hand-picking of the bags or cocoons can save your trees and shrubs.
  • Rake up fallen leaves and plant debris from under shrubs and trees to prevent future bagworm infestations.
  • Cut the bags from plants using a knife or garden shears. Simply pulling the bags away will leave a thread of silk that will girdle the twig as it grows.
  • Set out pheromone traps in August to capture males as they emerge and before they can mate. Pheromone traps simulate the female hormone, luring unsuspecting males to their death before mating.

MANUFACTURER RECOMMENDED PRODUCTS AND TREATMENT FOR Bagworms CONTROL

Pests need food, water, and shelter. Often the problem may be solved just by removing these key items. Before even thinking about chemical pest control, it is important to be aware of Pest’s Conducive conditions & It’s Recommendations.

Pesticides can be purchased in many different forms, each form has specific uses and application methods The pesticide application method you choose depends on the nature and habits of the target pest, the properties of the pesticide, the suitability of the application equipment, and the cost and efficiency of alternative methods. Your choice is often predetermined by one or more of these factors. Follow label directions for volume recommendations and application rates based on the pest to be controlled and utilize appropriate application tips on equipment. , these application methods are for informational purposes only. To know specific applications method/s for the product you buy, please refer actual packages for complete Label Verbiage.

9 Item(s)

Grid List

Set Descending Direction

9 Item(s)

Grid List

Set Descending Direction